DemoCamp Calgary, October 12th!

Creative Commons photo by Elessar

That’s right folks! It’s that time again; time to mosey on down to the SeVen RestoLounge on October 12th for DemoCamp Calgary!

  • When: October 12, 2010 at 6:30 PM
  • Where: SeVen RestoLounge (corner of 8th Avenue and 5th Street SW)
  • What: Demos, Beers, and Good Times!

The DemoCamp Calgary Crew

DemoCamp Calgary is organized by Patrick Lor, John Bristowe (@jbristowe), Sarah Blue (@superblue), and David Gluzman (@d4v):

We’re super-passionate about the startup/technical community in Calgary and want to provide the best possible forum for folks to collaborate and share ideas. For news and information about DemoCamp Calgary, make sure to check out our website: www.democampcalgary.com.

Wait. Stop. What’s DemoCamp?

For those of you who have never heard of DemoCamp before, you might be wondering: What is this all about? Well, it’s pretty simple: A bunch of us come together for a fun-filled, action-packed evening of demos from folks in the startup/technical community. For presenters delivering demos, we have some simple rules:

  • You have 5-10 minutes. (This varies based on the number of demos to get through.)
  • You must show working software.
  • No slides. None.

On the outside, these rules may seem a little strict but it’s for a purpose; the audience wants to see software, and lots of it! By keeping the time-to-demo short and sweet, the audience gets to see a lot of demos in a single go.

Some Tips on Delivering a Successful DemoCamp Presentation

Here are a few observations I’ve made while presenting/watching demos at DemoCamp:

  • Tell folks who you are and what you do in about 30 seconds or less.
  • Following this, if you have a request, state it openly at the beginning (e.g. “We’re currently seeking .NET developers to hire.”).
  • Jump immediately into your demo and tell the audience what you’re showing them.
  • During your demo, zoom-in on-screen to show folks what you want them to see (On Windows: There’s ZoomIt. On Mac OS X: There’s the Magnifier.)
  • Have a “Call to Action” near the end of your demo (e.g. “Check out X at Y).
  • At the end, if you have a request, repeat it (e.g. “We’re currently seeking .NET developers to hire.”).
  • Leave some time for questions. 2-3 minutes should be enough.
  • Bring business cards. Lots of business cards.
  • If you have a download-a-trial opportunity available, use it with this crowd. They’ll take you up on this offer!

From a how-to-deliver-a-technical-presentation perspective, check out Scott Hanselman’s post, Scott Hanselman’s Tips for a Successful MSFT Presentation. (Don’t worry too much about the “MSFT”; his tips still apply to all types of presentations.) Or, his excellent post, 11 Top Tips for a Successful Technical Presentation. Even better, go read Patrick Lor’s awesome post entitled, Killer Demos: A Guide To Presenting At DemoCamp Calgary. This is a must-read for any DemoCamp presenters.

If you’re in Calgary on October 12th and want to hang out with the startup/technical community and see some cool demos, swing on by to the SeVen RestoLounge! Alternatively, if you have a demo that you’d like to deliver, drop me a line via email (john.bristowe@microsoft.com).

See you at DemoCamp Calgary!